Currently Reading: Handsome Devil by Jessica E. Larsen and She Caught Me by D.R. Lee

Handsome Devil by Jessica Larsen (Cover taken from the book's Goodreads account)

Handsome Devil by Jessica Larsen (Cover taken from the book’s Goodreads account)

So, I’m done reading Real Life by Dolly M. Palisada and M.J. O’Shea’s Don’t Look and Midnight. I’ve rated all three books five stars. But they also left me with a heavy heart somewhat. Well, I must admit that though the stories are all sad, they were, at the same time, hopeful. Obviously, I loved all three, otherwise I wouldn’t have rated them 5/5.

The books I’ve chosen to read this time are happier ones. I hope.

I’m currently reading Jessica E. Larsen’s Handsome Devil. Check out its summary below which I’ve lifted from its Goodreads account:

Agad na nabighani si Yuna sa maamong mukha ni Benjamin nang una niya itong masilayan, ngunit agad rin niya itong kinamuhian matapos siya nitong ipahiya sa harap ng maraming tao.

Pinanalangin niyang hindi na sila nito muling magkita. Subalit masyado yatang abala ang Diyos dahil kabaliktaran ang nangyari. Pinagbantaan pa siya nito matapos niyang mapag-alaman na napili pala itong fiancé para sa kanya ng mga magulang, at napagpasyahang sa tahanan nila ito pansamantalang titira.

And there’s something more to Benjamin than meets eye.

The book is 140 pages but I’m sure it’s going to be a quick read.

You may find Jessica Larsen’s Handsome Devil in Goodreads by clicking the link below:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17828474-handsome-devil

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The other book is D.R. Lee’s She Caught Me. It’s a novelette with 10,400 words only so I’m pretty sure this is a quick read as well. Check out the summary of the story below-again, I took this from its Goodreads account:

She Caught Me by D.R. Lee (Cover taken from the book's Goodreads account)

She Caught Me by D.R. Lee (Cover taken from the book’s Goodreads account)

Melissa Castillo has had enough of hiding her feelings for her best friend Samuel Torres. They’ve been best friends for far too long, and she has been in love with him ever since forever! It also doesn’t help that Sam is a big tease. He always drops an innuendo or two when they’re together, but doesn’t really act on it.

Now that College graduation is just around the corner, Melissa finally convinced herself to push her inhibitions aside. She hatches a plan to reveal everything she felt for him without actually telling him!

You can check this book out here:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18622151-she-caught-me

Here’s to hoping you’ll all read these books with me! Cheers! ❤

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Currently Reading: Real Life by Dolly M. Palisada and M.J. O’Shea’s Don’t Look and Midnight

Photo was taken from Kcat's Facebook account

Photo was taken from Kcat’s Facebook account

My husband and I went to Ms. Dolly Palisada’s book launch in UP Balay Kalinaw yesterday. Her book, Real Life, features the stories of various “ordinary Filipinos” who all lead extraordinary lives.

One of these people featured in the book is our friend, Kcat Yarza.

I first heard of Kcat years ago when her life story was featured on a local TV show. I very rarely watch TV because I favor reading so much more. But that night, for some reason, I did. A year later, we will be introduced by a common friend and the rest is history.

I’m already halfway through the book and just like Kcat’s, the other stories featured in the book are as inspiring.

Below is the gist of every story in the book copied from its Goodreads account:

Pagpag for Breakfast (story of Ramil Sustento) & Box of Dreams (story of Nene)

• Take a peek into everyday life in Metro Manila’s poorest communities. Do their choices justify their appalling condition?

Leaving This Home is Water Under the Bridge (story of Lilia Dalmacio)

• What kind of mother would allow her children to sleep with a literal bridge over their heads?

Journey On A Wheelchair (story of Gaspar Salem)

• Born without hands and feet, Gaspar Salem of Zamboanga City dreams big — going to college and having his own business. But with war in the

Captured image of Ms. Dolly's dedication on my book.

Captured image of Ms. Dolly’s dedication on my book.

city, his limitations, can he?

A Heart for Animals (story of Renee Tupas Leoness from South Cotabato) 

Renee Tupas Leoness is a Filipino working in Thailand takes on an unlikely cause — animals. Will she be their voice?

Story of Hope In Singapore (story of Dahlia Rivera Supnad -an OFW in Singapore who is from Bacolod) & Let’s Meet Jamie (story of Jamie del Rosario Martinez)

• A tale of two women whose personal circumstances and life’s lessons pushed them to pursue happiness for others. 

Life Must Go On (story of Kathrina Yarza)

• Kcat Yarza, who has Neurofibromatosis, a genetic disorder that causes tumors on nerve tissues, still walks in stride and looks forward to what life has to offer.

The Heart of What We Do 

• This small charity has a big heart, but why did Workshops@IbaPa Charities Inc. chose the inmates of Iwahig Penal Colony as their beneficiary for Summer Pamasko Project? 

• Kaeskwela is taking leaps and bounds to send school supplies and books to the hinterlands of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao for the poor school children in public elementary schools. Find out how they do it.

You can get a copy at CentralBooks or email dm.palisada@gmail.com or rdapitan@yahoo.com. It is also available on iOs and Kindle Fire.

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Concurrently, I am also reading two of my favorite MM writer M.J. O’Shea’s free reads:

Don't Look by M.J. O'Shea

Don’t Look by M.J. O’Shea. Book cover was taken from its Goodreads account.

Christian and Sean had been in love for as long as they can remember. They’ve been living their happily ever after when their lives were rudely interrupted.

What are you willing to do and what are you willing to let go of just to be with the one you love? 🙂

You can download this free story from her site: http://www.mjoshearomance.com/Site/Free_Reads.html and you can review it here: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10254213-don-t-look

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Midnight

Midnight by M.J. O’Shea. Book cover was taken from its Goodreads account.

It only has three words of description on its Goodreads account: A ghostly romance. Hmmn, it sounds pretty exciting. Lol! You can download this for free and review it at the same time here:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10233916-midnight.

Happy reading! 🙂

Blog Tour – Book Spotlight + Giveaway: Guardians of Tradition (Philippines Only)

Blog Tour Header

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

by: Mae Astrid Tobias
Illustrations by: Rommel E. Joson
Photos by: Renato S. Rastrollo / National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA)

Excerpts:

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

What is the Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan? (p. 4)

Filipinos are very artistic people. All over the county, you find people who love to sing, dance, paint, write, play musical instruments, and create the most beautiful things the way their forebears have taught them. There are also special people who spend their entire lives making sure that these traditional arts are not forgotten.

The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan was created in 1992 through Republic Act No. 7355 in order to let the whole Philippines know about these people and their art.

For the duration of the Guardians of Tradition Blog Tour, Guardians of Tradition is available at discounted price at the Adarna showroom in Scout Torillo corner Scout Fernandez Streets, Barangay Sacred Heart, Quezon City 1103 Philippines (Trunkline: (632) 352-6765, Fax: (632) 352-6765 local 125, Email Address: adarnahouse@adarna.com.ph)

For international readers and Filipinos abroad, an ebook version is coming soon. To order paperback copies online, visit http://adarna.com.ph/authors/mae-astrid-tobias.html

Lang Dulay, Blanket of Dreams (pp. 12-13)

Lang Dulay of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato has been weaving t’nalak since she was twelve years old.

T’nalak is what the T’boli call the three-colored cloth made from fine abaca fiber. The three colors of the t’nalak represent the three places where the T’boli believe the soul goes when one dies. Hitem (black) is for people who died because of natural causes. Hulo (red) for those who died violently like by a bullet or a blade. Bukay (white) is for those who take taken their lives and those whose deaths were untimely.

Lang Dulay of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato: t’nalak weaver

Lang Dulay of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato: t’nalak weaver

The T’boli weavers, like Lang Dulay, get the designs for their t’nalak from their dreams. They believe that when Fu Dalu, the spirit of the abaca, shows them the design in their dreams, they must immediately weave it into cloth or else they might fall ill and soon forget the pattern. Sometimes, the designs are passed on from generation to generation, from grandmother to grandchild. Lang Dulay knows a hundred designs like the bulinglangit (clouds), the bangkiring (hair bangs), and the kabangi (butterfly).

When Lang Dulay became a Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan awardee, she was able to build a traditional long house where she teaches younger women how to weave.

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Suggested activity:

The T’boli get their ideas for t’nalak designs from their dreams. Dreams are good sources of ideas for stories, poems, and drawings. Why don’t you try to keep a dream journal? Get a small notebook and a pen. Keep it near your bed. Every morning when you wake up, write down or sketch what you remember from your dream the previous night.

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Uwang Ahadas, master of Yakan music.

Uwang Ahadas, master of Yakan music.

Uwang Ahadas, Maestro of Yakan Music (pp. 16-17)

Uwang Ahadas always wears a pair of dark glasses. He lost his eyesight when he was only five. But he does not let his disability keep him from becoming a master of Yakan music.

Together with his siblings, he learned to play different instruments like the gabbang and the agung. The instrument called the kwintangan kayu is supposed to be played by women only, but Ahadas broke this tradition and learned how to play this.

Ahadas wants children to learn to play instruments while they are young because their hands and wrists are still flexible. He teaches them by showing them his techniques.

Even when working in the fields, the Yakans play their musical instruments. One of these instruments is the gabbang. Small children play it to shoo away animals from planted crops. It looks like a xylophone, but it is made of five bamboo slats.

Another instrument is the kwintangan kayu which is made of five wooden logs hung horizontally under a tree near a ricefield. It is played to make the rice plants grow faster.

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Suggested activity:

Blind people have keener senses of touch, sound, taste, and scent. Try to find out how it feels to be blind by getting a handkerchief and covering your eyes. Notice the sounds, smells, textures, and taste of the things around you.

Join the Giveaway! Check out the fabulous prizes below!

FB Prize List

Giveaway: Simply click the giveaway link below and follow the instructions:

a Guardians of Tradition giveaway

Links:
Goodreads: Guardians of Tradition
To buy the book: Adarna Order Form
Publisher: Adarna House
NCCA: National Commission for Culture and the Arts

Thank you for joining the giveaway and for reading with us! Good luck! ^_^

Book Review: A French FairyFail by Jessica E. Larsen


French fairyfail
About the Book:

A French FairyFail, published by Flipside Publishing, is a Tagalog romance novel.

It’s a story of how one girl found love in a way she didn’t dream of. The main character – Liberty – is a sheltered, naïve 23 year old who grew up in Manila, Philippines and went to France in the hopes of finding her own “Prince Charming” just like in her fairytale books.

And during her very first day in France, she meet Léonce, a man who seemed to have been created based on her preference. However, for every fairy tale there’s an evil stepmother – an in Liberty case – it was in the form of Alexandros “Lex” Perrault, Léonce’s best friend.

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Meet the Characters:

Liberty Roxas

Liberty Roxas

Liberty Roxas

Age: 23

Profession: Fantasy writer.

Liberty is a sheltered, naïve woman who went to France hoping to find her own “Prince Charming” just like in her fairy tale books.

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Léonce Dupont
Léonce Dupont
Léonce Dupont
Age: 25 Profession: Veterinarian/Private animal shelter worker.
He’s Liberty’s target of affection because he was the way she imagined a Prince should be.
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Alexandros “Lex” Perrault

Alexandros "Lex" Perrault

Alexandros “Lex” Perrault
Age: 28

Profession: Vineyard manager.

Lex is Liberty’s uncle’s (her paternal aunt’s husband) nephew. He’s an ill-tempered guy especially towards Liberty whom he explicitly told he didn’t wish to have any connection with.

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My Review:

A French FairyFail is a fairy tale made in France.

I enjoyed reading this book. I have a penchant for a tsundere Prince Charming like Lex and a naïve Princess like Liberty. There were some “kilig” scenes made me giggle and smile a lot like a high school girl.

It was a welcome break from the emotionally charged ones that I’ve read in succession. My rating for this is 4 stars out of five. I personally feel that the first part was so eventful, highly-charged, and full of tension that the ending became anti-climactic. Besides, I didn’t have the heart to hate Léonce. He was a good guy, after all and perhaps that had put a damper for me in some ways. I think I can safely say that the last comment was largely due to a matter of preference.

I recommend A French FairyFail for Pinoys who love reading Tagalog Romance pocketbooks.

A French FairyFail is available for sale at: http://flipreads.com/french-fairyfail

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About the Author

Originally from the Philippines, Jessica has been writing since childhood but she only started sharing her work online in 2009. She was a member of an online publication group for Filipino writers and also a story blogger. She self-published one of her Filipino novels on Amazon in late December 2012.

And as of August 01, 2013, she officially signed her first contract with Flipside Publishing for her newest Filipino novel: A French FairyFail. To find out more about Jessica Larsen, visit her at: http://www.jessicaelarsen.com

You can also find her on Twitter @0512Yesika and Goodreads.

Book Review: Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan

Blog Tour Header I already talked about the book: GUARDIANS OF TRADITION: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan Thursday last week. For those who had missed my blog entry, you can find it using the link below:

GUARDIANS OF TRADITION

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

I love this book. There simply is no other way to say my feelings for it.

Just reading its summary—I already came into conclusion that GUARDIANS OF TRADITION is unique. Reading the entire book had only confirmed that theory.

The book talked about The Manlilikha ng Bayan awardees who are indeed guardians of tradition because they are the last few who promote and live by our ancestors’ culture and art. Masino Intaray of Pala’wan for example, keeps the Pala’wan’s musical and literary tradition so did Samaon Sulaiman of Maguindanao before he passed away in 2011. There is also Uwang Ahadas, a Maestro of Yakan Music.

It also featured weavers like Lang Dulay of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato; Salinta Monon of Tagabawa Bagobo; Darhata Sawabi of Barangay Parang, Jolo, Solo; and Hadja Amina Appi of Ungos Matata, Tandubas, Tawi-Tawi.

Alonzo Saclag is another noteworthy guardian of tradition awardee. He is called a Cultural Crusader because he is a proud cultural warrior.

Then there’s also Federico Caballero—dubbed as the Storyteller of Memories—probably mainly because the epics he can chant are in Kiniray-a—said to be a language that is no longer spoken.

Another interesting talent was that of Eduardo Mutuc who is dubbed as the Metalsmith of Saints.

I’m neither a musician nor a weaver, and I’m most certainly not a metalsmith! But I was happy reading about such talented people and I couldn’t help but envy Ginaw Bilog—the Engraver of Rhymes—who could read and write baybayin (baybayin was the Philippines’ writing system prior to the Spanish rule). Her talent was something that I would want for myself. While reading about her, I couldn’t help but think how it is to read poems and documents that had been written hundreds—maybe even thousands of years before!

The Philippines' traditions, culture and the arts at a glance.

The Philippines’ traditions, culture and the arts at a glance.

Yes, that’s what made this book vastly different from the others. It talks about the Philippines’ traditions, culture, art—that’s already existing long before the Spanish era and has been, thankfully, successfully handed down to the current generation by these awardees.

It showed that everywhere in the Philippines, even that long ago, we had talented people.

While I was reading, I was stuck to the term Pre-Spanish. Just how long ago was that?

It certainly made me grab my calculator. I couldn’t help it, I was curious! Well, it’s been 493 years since the Spanish rule. These traditions therefore, had existed for far longer than that. You could say that I was fascinated, captivated. It’s amazing that these talents have been passed down even after all these years.

I’m glad.

This is proof of our roots. These traditions are something that is originally ours—not an influence of some conqueror that had tried their best to subdue our ancestors and made them acquiesce using a clever excuse: that we were uncivilized.

Clearly, we were not. We would have been fine on our own. We would have been spared of the history of abuse that has been perpetuating since the Spanish era. Even now Filipinos seem to think that the best way to rule our country is to abuse their power by taking the money from taxes, land, etc. of the people. Riches that are not rightfully theirs.

And, as in during that time, we—the greater majority—continually let them. Only, the abusers are undoubtedly not foreigners anymore but our very own people.

Why not? We have certainly learned from the best. It had been going on for over 300 years that the Filipinos had finally accepted the practice as a norm.

The readers may scoff and say that the book is just a children’s book and had nothing to do with the mess that is our country and the scammers and thieves that we call politicians (Yes, yes, I know. Not everyone is like that. Maybe).

I beg to defer. GUARDIANS OF TRADITION tells us a lot. It tells us that our culture was rich. And more than that, it was ours. We had a strong set of values. We used to not get the tax money of our people. We had talent and we use them instead.

The way I see it, the opposite had happened after we were conquered: that the Filipinos became barbaric like our conquerors were as we sought for that power for ourselves. How else would you call plotting and killing people of our own—people who were deemed on the way to getting that power—people who were like Andres Bonifacio? Remember the Martial Law? Remember the people who would just suddenly disappear never to be seen again?

The sad thing is that these things still happen. It’s such a vicious, vicious cycle that we keep repeating. Why? Because we Filipinos don’t know our roots. That we weren’t like that, at all. We had talents. Killing people for money and stealing the public funds and grabbing lands were something that was started by the Spanish friars. Let’s not emulate them anymore.

I know I already sound like a broken record so I will stop. If we don’t try to understand this collectively—as a people, no matter what I say—it will be useless anyway.

Let me just conclude this by saying that books like GUARDIANS OF TRADITION have the power to make us look back.

It tells us our truth.

It tells us of history that we do not know and in effect, make us proud. Because these things happened hundreds of years ago when we were not yet alive, the Filipinos of today didn’t know that we weren’t like this before and therefore, accept things as they were because it was standard practice.

Kudos to Adarna for producing books like this one and the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) for making sure the Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan act lives on and that the deserving people get recognized (Although if you ask me, I think their grant must be increased. That way, the awardees will be able to build schools just as Lang Dulay had, making the learning and sharing of their craft and talent more accessible).

And of course, kudos also to the talented bookmakers as well: Mae Astrid Tobias who wrote the book, Rommel E. Joson who made the illustrations, and Renato S. Rastrollo who took the pictures of the “Guardians.”

Now, if only Filipinos would love reading as well. They would know that GUARDIANS OF TRADITION exists. Then again, going back to that era again, reading was practically prohibited. The friars were so afraid our ancestors would become “educated” and “enlightened” they would revolt against them. And the friars were right, voracious readers like Rizal and Bonifacio after all, were the ones who ignited the revolution.

Now I know why only few of us loved to read. What a tragedy, indeed. But let us all change that. After all, it’s been 115 years since that period. It’s time to stop the corruption. It’s time to read. There are no friars anymore who will persecute us if we do otherwise.

It’s time to break this vicious cycle.

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For the duration of the Guardians of Tradition Blog Tour, Guardians of Tradition is available at discounted price at the Adarna showroom in Scout Torillo corner Scout Fernandez Streets, Barangay Sacred Heart, Quezon City 1103 Philippines (Trunkline: (632) 352-6765, Fax: (632) 352-6765 local 125, Email Address: adarnahouse@adarna.com.ph)

For international readers and Filipinos abroad, an ebook version is coming soon. To order paperback copies online, visit http://adarna.com.ph/authors/mae-astrid-tobias.html

Come back to my blog on October 18, 2013 and join our raffle. We will be giving away exciting prizes which includes Amazon Gift Cards, signed copies of Guardians of Tradition from Adarna, and CDs of National Living Treasure Bayan Sumaon Sulaiman from NCCA to 10 lucky winners!

Needless to say, I rate Guardians of Tradition 5/5 and is highly recommended to everyone – both young and adults – especially Filipinos.

Thank you for reading this entry.

Currently Reading: His First, Her Last

The Incredible True Story of an American Lost in the Philippines by  Jonathan Sturak

The Incredible True Story of an American Lost in the Philippines by Jonathan Sturak

I’m done with Jessica Larsen’s A French FairyFail. And I’m moving on to read the book I just received this night as a gift – a copy of Jonathan Sturak’s latest novel. It’s entitled His First, Her Last: The Incredible True Story of an American Lost in the Philippines.

I decided to read this one next because I wanted to know what other people think of our country – their perceptions, experiences during their visit here, among others. I wanted to know the cultural differences, too. So, I thought, what better way to find out than read their thoughts and their first-hand experience?

I’m already done reading the first five chapters of the book and I loved it. Check out the book’s summary below:

About the Book:

Engaged couple Jason and Hazel travel across the world to meet her family in this true story of love and adventure.

The moment Jason steps off the plane in the Philippines, an exotic island caught between the East and the West, the past and the present, grabs hold of this naive American and seduces him with its beauty, its places, and its people. Temptation looms as the best friend of Hazel tests their relationship and touches their souls. A deeply personal account of the conflict of culture between American excess and Philippine poverty, His First, Her Last explores the ability of love to transcend two worlds apart. But after an accident spills blood on the streets of a remote village, the lives of this couple flash before their eyes. Will he escape? Will she survive? Will his first trip be her last?

About the Author:

Jonathan Sturak grew up in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania. He is a Penn State University graduate and holds degrees in Computer Science and Film. He currently lives in Las Vegas where he uses the energy of the city to craft stories about life and the human condition. “The Place Called Home,” Sturak’s essay about Eastern European heritage in Northeast PA, was featured on Glass Cases, associate literary agent Sarah LaPolla’s pop culture blog at http://glasscasesblog.blogspot.com/2010/09/place-called-home.html.

Sturak is also a contributing editor at http://NoirNation.com, the premier location for international crime fiction. His debut thriller novel “Clouded Rainbow” was published in December 2009 and has over 100,000 downloads on the Amazon Kindle. New for 2013 are two exciting novels, his crime thriller “Vegas Was Her Name” published by Noir Nation Books, as well as his adventure romance “His First, Her Last: The Incredible True Story of an American Lost in the Philippines.” Sturak keeps updated information on his website at http://sturak.com.

You can buy the book in Amazon using this link:

His First, Her Last

Happy reading!

Currently Reading: Guardians of Tradition

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012) by Mae Astrid Tobias, Illustrations by Rommel E. Joson, Photos by Renato S. Rastrollo / National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA)

In preparation for the book’s blog tour next week, October 13 to 19, 2013, I’m reading Guardians of Tradition today!

About the Book:

Who are the indigenous and folk artists of the Philippines? Guardians of Tradition is full of facts about 11 of Philippine master weavers, folk musicians, performing artists, mat weavers and metal smiths whose talents and skills have earned them the title Manlilikha ng Bayan. Designed to help children recognize native Filipino ingenuity and creativity, the book includes fun activities to promote appreciation for culture and arts. Guardians of Tradition has a fun and colorful design that appeals to young readers.

For the duration of the Guardians of Tradition Blog Tour, Guardians of Tradition is available at discounted price at the Adarna showroom in Scout Torillo corner Scout Fernandez Streets, Barangay Sacred Heart, Quezon City 1103 Philippines (Trunkline: (632) 352-6765, Fax: (632) 352-6765 local 125, Email Address: adarnahouse@adarna.com.ph)

For international readers and Filipinos abroad, an ebook version is coming soon. To order paperback copies online, visit http://adarna.com.ph/authors/mae-astrid-tobias.html

What is the Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan? 

Filipinos are very artistic people. All over the county, you find people who love to sing, dance, paint, write, play musical instruments, and create the most beautiful things the way their forebears have taught them. There are also special people who spend their entire lives making sure that these traditional arts are not forgotten.

The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan was created in 1992 through Republic Act No. 7355 in order to let the whole Philippines know about these people and their art.

Author Bio:

MAE ASTRID TOBIAS (1979-2009) was a Palanca-award winning author of children’s books. In addition to Guardians of Tradition, her books include Blue Bananas (Crucible), Bayong ng Kuting (Lampara Books), My Forest Friends (Haribon), Bakawan (Adarna Books) and two books retelling the Ifugao traditional chant, hudhud. These are Halikpon: A Retelling of an Ancient Ifugao Chant and Pumbakhayon: An Origin Myth of the Ifugao Hudhud. Both are finalists for children’s literature and best design in the 2006 National Book Awards of the Manila Critics Circle.

She also spent several years in the field of children’s television. She served as the Manila Bureau Manager of Kabataan News Network, a project of UNICEF and Probe Media Foundation that trains young people nationwide how to produce their own broadcast quality documentaries. She also wrote episodes for children shows like Sirit!, and ABS-CBN and Eskuwela ng Bayan, as well as worked for Philippine Junior Inquirer and Shell Foundation. She was a member of Kuwentista ng mga Tsikiting  (KUTING), an organization of Filipino writers for children.

Illustrator Bio:

ROMMEL JOSON is a painter and an illustrator. He graduated magna cum laude and College Valedictorian from the University of Philippines College of Fine Arts. He was also a Merit Scholar and a recipient of the Dean’s Awards for Visual Awards from the Ateneo de Manila University, where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management. He worked in the advertising industry for several years before devoting his time fully to painting and illustration. He has received awards and citations for painting, illustration, comics, and design from various organizations such as the Philippine Board of Books for Young People (Honorable Mention), the Shell National Art Competition (3rd Place Oil/Acrylic Category), the Neil Gaiman/Fully Booked Graphic Fiction Competition (3rd Place in the Graphic Fiction category), the Adobo Design Awards (Silver) and the Philippine Araw Awards (Silver in Art Direction) and the Metrobank Art and Design Excellence Competition (Semifinalist in Oil). He is currently an active member of Ang Ilustrador ng Kabataan (Ang INK).

Photographer Bio:

RENATO S. RASTROLLO, is a photographer, graphic artist, book and exhibit designer. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts major in Advertising from the Philippine Women’s University. With over 25 years of experience in the field of documentary photography, his works have appeared in national and international publications. Presently, he is a culture and arts officer  at the Cultural Center of the Philippines.

Links:
Goodreads: Guardians of Tradition
To buy the book: Adarna Order Form
Publisher: Adarna House
NCCA: National Commission for Culture and the Arts

We will be giving away exciting prizes which includes Amazon Gift Cards, signed copies of Guardians of Tradition from Adarna, and CDs of National Living Treasure Bayan Sumaon Sulaiman from NCCA to 10 lucky winners! I hope that you will come back next week specifically on October 14 and 18. 🙂