Guest Post by Harvey Lincoln, Author of 33 Ermine Street

On Writing 33 Ermine Street 

When I first started writing ’33 Ermine Street’ I intended to not only develop a strong storyline, but to create a central theme and develop the characters around it. In practice this meant spending the first six months doing nothing else other than sticking post-it notes against a cupboard door. Each note contained little parts of the story, character ideas and settings etc. When I felt I finally had what I wanted I started to type up small and very rough parts of the story, alongside doing quite a bit of background research to fill in any contextual gaps. In the end this process resulted in a 60-page outline of what was going to be the novel ’33 Ermine Street’.

I guess it sounds like a very methodical approach to writing, and I’m sure many writers would choose a very different approach to mine. My background as a designer was probably the reason behind this. People often think that being a designer is all about coming up with the most amazing ideas together with other free spirited designers. Well, it’s not really (sorry). It’s fun but it’s also hard work. Hard work that starts with research, endless sketching and keeping focused on the result you were aiming for all that time.

It was these skills that mostly helped me out with writing the novel. But there were more needed to complete it. I discovered how difficult it was to describe a scene the way I had it in my mind. In that sense, sketching it out is a lot easier. Words form an endless array of variables that you need to keep tuning until you get what you want. That was by far the hardest thing I learned.

Another thing I noticed, was how attached you get to the characters. Shen with his strong will, Alfred – the grumpy old man from down the road, and Sandeep – the local shopkeeper who was always ready to offer his advice. Although the characters are entirely fictional, they have all become dear friends of mine.

I truly hope that some of you will get to know them too. And when you do I hope you enjoy reading ’33 Ermine Street’ as much as I have enjoyed writing it.

Jho-sigstylediv

About the Book

“Religion is a human invention – love isn’t. It lives inside every person, no matter who they are, or what they do or do not believe in. Love is the only thing a person truly needs to believe in to receive love in return.”

Being an only child growing up in a Chinese immigrant family, Shen lives a relatively quiet and sheltered life in comparison to most other British teenagers. His parents, who ended up running a small Chinese restaurant, work tirelessly to make sure their only child is given the opportunities that they missed out on in life.

It’s a day like any other, when Shen becomes witness to a traumatic incident on his usual route to school. From that moment on, his peaceful and uneventful teenage life takes a drastic turn as he struggles to cope with the grim memories of that fateful morning.

Shen embarks on a very personal journey in an attempt to understand what happened. In the weeks and months that follow, he finds himself hurled into a turbulent world driven by fear, prejudice and social injustice.

33 Ermine Street is a touching yet confronting novel, set against the backdrop of a heavily polarized Britain.

Purchase Link:

amazon UK

Goodreadsbadge

http://www.33erminestreet.com

About the Author

Harvey Lincoln was born and raised in the south of The Netherlands. He lived there for many years before moving to the UK in 2002 where he studied for both a Bachelors and Masters Degree in Graphic Design. He has since returned to The Netherlands where he lives together with his English wife.
33 Ermine Street is his first novel.

Bumasa at Lumaya: Celebrate the 33rd National Children’s Book Day with PBBY

bumasa at lumaya

The month of July is dedicated to the promotion of children’s books. The National Children’s Book Day (NCBD) is celebrated every third Tuesday of this month. With this year’s theme, Bumasa at Lumaya, the Philippine Board on Books for Young People (PBBY) will be having a string of events to honor book creators and to promote reading among the young.

National Children’s Book Day
In partnership with the National Book Development Board (NBDB), the 3rd National Children’s Book Awards (NCBA) will be held at the Cultural Center of the Philippines on July 19. This highly-anticipated event recognizes the excellent works of children’s book writers, illustrators, and publishers. Another highlight of this day is the awarding of the 2016 PBBY-Salanga and PBBY-Alcala winners.

Book fair and Children’s Literature Talks
The Book Fair and Children’s Literature Talks will be held on July 23 at the Xavier School in San Juan. The fair shall feature local children’s book publishers. Aside from selling selected titles at a discounted rate, publishers will also hold simultaneous storytelling sessions. A special package of all winning NCBA titles, from 2010 to 2016, may also be purchased at the fair.

The culmination of the NCBD celebration is the Children’s Literature Talks. The program will start with the book launch of Bumasa at Lumaya 2, a Sourcebook on Children’s Literature in the Philippines.

This whole-day event will also be a gathering of writers, illustrators, students, storytellers, teachers, librarians, and parents. For a registration fee of PHP800.00, participants may choose to attend among discussions on writing sensitive stories, body positivity on young adult fiction, the evolution of children’s book illustrations, raising multilingual readers, and more. Award-winning author, Augie Rivera (Alamat ng Ampalaya, Isang Harding Papel); illustrator, Liza Flores (Chenelyn! Chenelyn!); and reading advocate and educator, Victor Villanueva (Reading Association of the Philippines) are some of the industry experts who will be sharing their knowledge on children’s content and reading. Organizations such as The Learning Library and The Learning Basket will also share their expertise on multilingualism and homeschooling respectively.

For inquiries about the Book Fair and Children’s Literature Talks, you may e-mail ncbdph@gmail.com or call 352-6765 loc 204.

Book Fair and Talks

PBBY Fact Sheet

The Philippine Board on Books for Young People

The PBBY is a private, non-stock, non-profit organization committed to the development of children’s literature in the Philippines.

The PBBY is the lead agency in the celebration of National Children’s Book Day (NCBD). This is celebrated every third week of July to commemorate the anniversary of the publication of Jose Rizal’s “The Monkey and the Turtle” in Trubner’s Oriental Record in London.

The PBBY is composed of permanent and institutional members and individuals representing different sectors. The institutional members are The National Library, the Cultural Center of the Philippines, and Museo Pambata. The individual members represent educators, researchers, librarians, book reviewers, writers, illustrators, storytellers, publishers, booksellers and mass media.

Officers

  • Tarie Sabido (Chair)
  • Dina Ocampo (Vice-Chair)
  • Ani Rosa Almario (Secretary-General)
  • Victor Villanueva (Treasurer)

Permanent Members

  • The National Library
  • Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP) represented by
    Hermie Beltran
  • Museo Pambata represented by Dr. Nina Lim-Yuson

Sectoral Representation

  • Emily Abrera (mass media)
  • Karina Africa-Bolasco (booksellers)
  • Tarie Sabido (book reviewers)
  • Dr. Luis Gatmaitan (writers)
  • Victor Villanueva (educators, basic education)
  • Ramon Sunico (educators, tertiary)
  • Dina Ocampo (researchers)
  • Fran Ong (publishers)
  • Ruben de Jesus (illustrators)
  • Zarah Gagatiga (librarians)
  • Rey Bufi (storytellers)
  • Inquirer Read-Along (reading advocacy)

Honorary Chairman

  • Dr. Lucrecia Kasilag †, National Artist

List of Books Read this November

I saw my friend’s list of the books she read this November. I thought it was a good idea so here I am… listing the books I’ve read this month.

Handsome Devil by Jessica Larsen (Cover taken from the book's Goodreads account)

Handsome Devil by Jessica Larsen (Cover taken from the book’s Goodreads account)

The Shed by Paul Levas

The Shed by Paul Levas

She Caught Me by D.R. Lee (Cover taken from the book's Goodreads account)

She Caught Me by D.R. Lee (Cover taken from the book’s Goodreads account)

Snug Fit by Anna Bayes; cover taken from the book's Goodreads account.

Snug Fit by Anna Bayes; cover taken from the book’s Goodreads account.

The Matchmaker by Megan Derr

The Matchmaker by Megan Derr

The Shadows by Paul Levas

The Shadows by Paul Levas

Beauty and The Bible: The Testimonies of Sarah, Rebekah, Rachel, Esther, Abigail, Tamar and the Daughters of Job  by Reev Robledo

Beauty and The Bible: The Testimonies of Sarah, Rebekah, Rachel, Esther, Abigail, Tamar and the Daughters of Job by Reev Robledo

 ラブ・ミー・ベイベー [Love Me Baby] by Sasamura Gou, 笹村剛

ラブ・ミー・ベイベー [Love Me Baby]
by Sasamura Gou, 笹村剛

 After A Storm (嵐のあと #1) by Shoko Hidaka, Shoko Hidaka

After A Storm (嵐のあと #1)
by Shoko Hidaka, Shoko Hidaka

Don't Forget the Soap by Marie Claire Lim Moore

Don’t Forget the Soap by Marie Claire Lim Moore

Ngumiti si Andoy ni Xi Zuq at Dominic Agsaway

Ngumiti si Andoy ni Xi Zuq at Dominic Agsaway

and this one:
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13494082-drunk-text – a freebie I’ve read online.

All in all, I’ve read more than what’s listed in here. But most are ongoing series in various free sites while the other manga, I’ve failed to note. I’m pleased however, that in this list, I’ve managed to read 5 Pinoy books (one Tagalog romance pocketbook by Jessica Larsen, one children’s book about a hero by Xi Zuq, one memoir by Marie Claire Lim Moore, one religious book with an awesome soundtrack by Reev Robledo, one romance novelette by D.R. Lee) out of 12. Of the 12, four are M/M , two are horror/suspense both by Paul Levas, while the remaining one is erotica by Anna Bayes.

Blog Tour – Book Spotlight + Giveaway: Guardians of Tradition (Philippines Only)

Blog Tour Header

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

by: Mae Astrid Tobias
Illustrations by: Rommel E. Joson
Photos by: Renato S. Rastrollo / National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA)

Excerpts:

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

What is the Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan? (p. 4)

Filipinos are very artistic people. All over the county, you find people who love to sing, dance, paint, write, play musical instruments, and create the most beautiful things the way their forebears have taught them. There are also special people who spend their entire lives making sure that these traditional arts are not forgotten.

The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan was created in 1992 through Republic Act No. 7355 in order to let the whole Philippines know about these people and their art.

For the duration of the Guardians of Tradition Blog Tour, Guardians of Tradition is available at discounted price at the Adarna showroom in Scout Torillo corner Scout Fernandez Streets, Barangay Sacred Heart, Quezon City 1103 Philippines (Trunkline: (632) 352-6765, Fax: (632) 352-6765 local 125, Email Address: adarnahouse@adarna.com.ph)

For international readers and Filipinos abroad, an ebook version is coming soon. To order paperback copies online, visit http://adarna.com.ph/authors/mae-astrid-tobias.html

Lang Dulay, Blanket of Dreams (pp. 12-13)

Lang Dulay of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato has been weaving t’nalak since she was twelve years old.

T’nalak is what the T’boli call the three-colored cloth made from fine abaca fiber. The three colors of the t’nalak represent the three places where the T’boli believe the soul goes when one dies. Hitem (black) is for people who died because of natural causes. Hulo (red) for those who died violently like by a bullet or a blade. Bukay (white) is for those who take taken their lives and those whose deaths were untimely.

Lang Dulay of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato: t’nalak weaver

Lang Dulay of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato: t’nalak weaver

The T’boli weavers, like Lang Dulay, get the designs for their t’nalak from their dreams. They believe that when Fu Dalu, the spirit of the abaca, shows them the design in their dreams, they must immediately weave it into cloth or else they might fall ill and soon forget the pattern. Sometimes, the designs are passed on from generation to generation, from grandmother to grandchild. Lang Dulay knows a hundred designs like the bulinglangit (clouds), the bangkiring (hair bangs), and the kabangi (butterfly).

When Lang Dulay became a Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan awardee, she was able to build a traditional long house where she teaches younger women how to weave.

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Suggested activity:

The T’boli get their ideas for t’nalak designs from their dreams. Dreams are good sources of ideas for stories, poems, and drawings. Why don’t you try to keep a dream journal? Get a small notebook and a pen. Keep it near your bed. Every morning when you wake up, write down or sketch what you remember from your dream the previous night.

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Uwang Ahadas, master of Yakan music.

Uwang Ahadas, master of Yakan music.

Uwang Ahadas, Maestro of Yakan Music (pp. 16-17)

Uwang Ahadas always wears a pair of dark glasses. He lost his eyesight when he was only five. But he does not let his disability keep him from becoming a master of Yakan music.

Together with his siblings, he learned to play different instruments like the gabbang and the agung. The instrument called the kwintangan kayu is supposed to be played by women only, but Ahadas broke this tradition and learned how to play this.

Ahadas wants children to learn to play instruments while they are young because their hands and wrists are still flexible. He teaches them by showing them his techniques.

Even when working in the fields, the Yakans play their musical instruments. One of these instruments is the gabbang. Small children play it to shoo away animals from planted crops. It looks like a xylophone, but it is made of five bamboo slats.

Another instrument is the kwintangan kayu which is made of five wooden logs hung horizontally under a tree near a ricefield. It is played to make the rice plants grow faster.

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Suggested activity:

Blind people have keener senses of touch, sound, taste, and scent. Try to find out how it feels to be blind by getting a handkerchief and covering your eyes. Notice the sounds, smells, textures, and taste of the things around you.

Join the Giveaway! Check out the fabulous prizes below!

FB Prize List

Giveaway: Simply click the giveaway link below and follow the instructions:

a Guardians of Tradition giveaway

Links:
Goodreads: Guardians of Tradition
To buy the book: Adarna Order Form
Publisher: Adarna House
NCCA: National Commission for Culture and the Arts

Thank you for joining the giveaway and for reading with us! Good luck! ^_^

Book Review: Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan

Blog Tour Header I already talked about the book: GUARDIANS OF TRADITION: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan Thursday last week. For those who had missed my blog entry, you can find it using the link below:

GUARDIANS OF TRADITION

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

I love this book. There simply is no other way to say my feelings for it.

Just reading its summary—I already came into conclusion that GUARDIANS OF TRADITION is unique. Reading the entire book had only confirmed that theory.

The book talked about The Manlilikha ng Bayan awardees who are indeed guardians of tradition because they are the last few who promote and live by our ancestors’ culture and art. Masino Intaray of Pala’wan for example, keeps the Pala’wan’s musical and literary tradition so did Samaon Sulaiman of Maguindanao before he passed away in 2011. There is also Uwang Ahadas, a Maestro of Yakan Music.

It also featured weavers like Lang Dulay of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato; Salinta Monon of Tagabawa Bagobo; Darhata Sawabi of Barangay Parang, Jolo, Solo; and Hadja Amina Appi of Ungos Matata, Tandubas, Tawi-Tawi.

Alonzo Saclag is another noteworthy guardian of tradition awardee. He is called a Cultural Crusader because he is a proud cultural warrior.

Then there’s also Federico Caballero—dubbed as the Storyteller of Memories—probably mainly because the epics he can chant are in Kiniray-a—said to be a language that is no longer spoken.

Another interesting talent was that of Eduardo Mutuc who is dubbed as the Metalsmith of Saints.

I’m neither a musician nor a weaver, and I’m most certainly not a metalsmith! But I was happy reading about such talented people and I couldn’t help but envy Ginaw Bilog—the Engraver of Rhymes—who could read and write baybayin (baybayin was the Philippines’ writing system prior to the Spanish rule). Her talent was something that I would want for myself. While reading about her, I couldn’t help but think how it is to read poems and documents that had been written hundreds—maybe even thousands of years before!

The Philippines' traditions, culture and the arts at a glance.

The Philippines’ traditions, culture and the arts at a glance.

Yes, that’s what made this book vastly different from the others. It talks about the Philippines’ traditions, culture, art—that’s already existing long before the Spanish era and has been, thankfully, successfully handed down to the current generation by these awardees.

It showed that everywhere in the Philippines, even that long ago, we had talented people.

While I was reading, I was stuck to the term Pre-Spanish. Just how long ago was that?

It certainly made me grab my calculator. I couldn’t help it, I was curious! Well, it’s been 493 years since the Spanish rule. These traditions therefore, had existed for far longer than that. You could say that I was fascinated, captivated. It’s amazing that these talents have been passed down even after all these years.

I’m glad.

This is proof of our roots. These traditions are something that is originally ours—not an influence of some conqueror that had tried their best to subdue our ancestors and made them acquiesce using a clever excuse: that we were uncivilized.

Clearly, we were not. We would have been fine on our own. We would have been spared of the history of abuse that has been perpetuating since the Spanish era. Even now Filipinos seem to think that the best way to rule our country is to abuse their power by taking the money from taxes, land, etc. of the people. Riches that are not rightfully theirs.

And, as in during that time, we—the greater majority—continually let them. Only, the abusers are undoubtedly not foreigners anymore but our very own people.

Why not? We have certainly learned from the best. It had been going on for over 300 years that the Filipinos had finally accepted the practice as a norm.

The readers may scoff and say that the book is just a children’s book and had nothing to do with the mess that is our country and the scammers and thieves that we call politicians (Yes, yes, I know. Not everyone is like that. Maybe).

I beg to defer. GUARDIANS OF TRADITION tells us a lot. It tells us that our culture was rich. And more than that, it was ours. We had a strong set of values. We used to not get the tax money of our people. We had talent and we use them instead.

The way I see it, the opposite had happened after we were conquered: that the Filipinos became barbaric like our conquerors were as we sought for that power for ourselves. How else would you call plotting and killing people of our own—people who were deemed on the way to getting that power—people who were like Andres Bonifacio? Remember the Martial Law? Remember the people who would just suddenly disappear never to be seen again?

The sad thing is that these things still happen. It’s such a vicious, vicious cycle that we keep repeating. Why? Because we Filipinos don’t know our roots. That we weren’t like that, at all. We had talents. Killing people for money and stealing the public funds and grabbing lands were something that was started by the Spanish friars. Let’s not emulate them anymore.

I know I already sound like a broken record so I will stop. If we don’t try to understand this collectively—as a people, no matter what I say—it will be useless anyway.

Let me just conclude this by saying that books like GUARDIANS OF TRADITION have the power to make us look back.

It tells us our truth.

It tells us of history that we do not know and in effect, make us proud. Because these things happened hundreds of years ago when we were not yet alive, the Filipinos of today didn’t know that we weren’t like this before and therefore, accept things as they were because it was standard practice.

Kudos to Adarna for producing books like this one and the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) for making sure the Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan act lives on and that the deserving people get recognized (Although if you ask me, I think their grant must be increased. That way, the awardees will be able to build schools just as Lang Dulay had, making the learning and sharing of their craft and talent more accessible).

And of course, kudos also to the talented bookmakers as well: Mae Astrid Tobias who wrote the book, Rommel E. Joson who made the illustrations, and Renato S. Rastrollo who took the pictures of the “Guardians.”

Now, if only Filipinos would love reading as well. They would know that GUARDIANS OF TRADITION exists. Then again, going back to that era again, reading was practically prohibited. The friars were so afraid our ancestors would become “educated” and “enlightened” they would revolt against them. And the friars were right, voracious readers like Rizal and Bonifacio after all, were the ones who ignited the revolution.

Now I know why only few of us loved to read. What a tragedy, indeed. But let us all change that. After all, it’s been 115 years since that period. It’s time to stop the corruption. It’s time to read. There are no friars anymore who will persecute us if we do otherwise.

It’s time to break this vicious cycle.

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For the duration of the Guardians of Tradition Blog Tour, Guardians of Tradition is available at discounted price at the Adarna showroom in Scout Torillo corner Scout Fernandez Streets, Barangay Sacred Heart, Quezon City 1103 Philippines (Trunkline: (632) 352-6765, Fax: (632) 352-6765 local 125, Email Address: adarnahouse@adarna.com.ph)

For international readers and Filipinos abroad, an ebook version is coming soon. To order paperback copies online, visit http://adarna.com.ph/authors/mae-astrid-tobias.html

Come back to my blog on October 18, 2013 and join our raffle. We will be giving away exciting prizes which includes Amazon Gift Cards, signed copies of Guardians of Tradition from Adarna, and CDs of National Living Treasure Bayan Sumaon Sulaiman from NCCA to 10 lucky winners!

Needless to say, I rate Guardians of Tradition 5/5 and is highly recommended to everyone – both young and adults – especially Filipinos.

Thank you for reading this entry.

Currently Reading: Guardians of Tradition

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012)

Guardians of Tradition: The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (2012) by Mae Astrid Tobias, Illustrations by Rommel E. Joson, Photos by Renato S. Rastrollo / National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA)

In preparation for the book’s blog tour next week, October 13 to 19, 2013, I’m reading Guardians of Tradition today!

About the Book:

Who are the indigenous and folk artists of the Philippines? Guardians of Tradition is full of facts about 11 of Philippine master weavers, folk musicians, performing artists, mat weavers and metal smiths whose talents and skills have earned them the title Manlilikha ng Bayan. Designed to help children recognize native Filipino ingenuity and creativity, the book includes fun activities to promote appreciation for culture and arts. Guardians of Tradition has a fun and colorful design that appeals to young readers.

For the duration of the Guardians of Tradition Blog Tour, Guardians of Tradition is available at discounted price at the Adarna showroom in Scout Torillo corner Scout Fernandez Streets, Barangay Sacred Heart, Quezon City 1103 Philippines (Trunkline: (632) 352-6765, Fax: (632) 352-6765 local 125, Email Address: adarnahouse@adarna.com.ph)

For international readers and Filipinos abroad, an ebook version is coming soon. To order paperback copies online, visit http://adarna.com.ph/authors/mae-astrid-tobias.html

What is the Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan? 

Filipinos are very artistic people. All over the county, you find people who love to sing, dance, paint, write, play musical instruments, and create the most beautiful things the way their forebears have taught them. There are also special people who spend their entire lives making sure that these traditional arts are not forgotten.

The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan was created in 1992 through Republic Act No. 7355 in order to let the whole Philippines know about these people and their art.

Author Bio:

MAE ASTRID TOBIAS (1979-2009) was a Palanca-award winning author of children’s books. In addition to Guardians of Tradition, her books include Blue Bananas (Crucible), Bayong ng Kuting (Lampara Books), My Forest Friends (Haribon), Bakawan (Adarna Books) and two books retelling the Ifugao traditional chant, hudhud. These are Halikpon: A Retelling of an Ancient Ifugao Chant and Pumbakhayon: An Origin Myth of the Ifugao Hudhud. Both are finalists for children’s literature and best design in the 2006 National Book Awards of the Manila Critics Circle.

She also spent several years in the field of children’s television. She served as the Manila Bureau Manager of Kabataan News Network, a project of UNICEF and Probe Media Foundation that trains young people nationwide how to produce their own broadcast quality documentaries. She also wrote episodes for children shows like Sirit!, and ABS-CBN and Eskuwela ng Bayan, as well as worked for Philippine Junior Inquirer and Shell Foundation. She was a member of Kuwentista ng mga Tsikiting  (KUTING), an organization of Filipino writers for children.

Illustrator Bio:

ROMMEL JOSON is a painter and an illustrator. He graduated magna cum laude and College Valedictorian from the University of Philippines College of Fine Arts. He was also a Merit Scholar and a recipient of the Dean’s Awards for Visual Awards from the Ateneo de Manila University, where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management. He worked in the advertising industry for several years before devoting his time fully to painting and illustration. He has received awards and citations for painting, illustration, comics, and design from various organizations such as the Philippine Board of Books for Young People (Honorable Mention), the Shell National Art Competition (3rd Place Oil/Acrylic Category), the Neil Gaiman/Fully Booked Graphic Fiction Competition (3rd Place in the Graphic Fiction category), the Adobo Design Awards (Silver) and the Philippine Araw Awards (Silver in Art Direction) and the Metrobank Art and Design Excellence Competition (Semifinalist in Oil). He is currently an active member of Ang Ilustrador ng Kabataan (Ang INK).

Photographer Bio:

RENATO S. RASTROLLO, is a photographer, graphic artist, book and exhibit designer. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts major in Advertising from the Philippine Women’s University. With over 25 years of experience in the field of documentary photography, his works have appeared in national and international publications. Presently, he is a culture and arts officer  at the Cultural Center of the Philippines.

Links:
Goodreads: Guardians of Tradition
To buy the book: Adarna Order Form
Publisher: Adarna House
NCCA: National Commission for Culture and the Arts

We will be giving away exciting prizes which includes Amazon Gift Cards, signed copies of Guardians of Tradition from Adarna, and CDs of National Living Treasure Bayan Sumaon Sulaiman from NCCA to 10 lucky winners! I hope that you will come back next week specifically on October 14 and 18. 🙂

My Copy of Guardians of Tradition

So, I’m already done with Bones of Contention though I still have to write my review. The discussion is still, of course, ongoing. And, I have a new book! It arrived on my doorstep today.

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It’s called:

Guardians of Tradition 

The Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan

It was written by Mae Astrid Tobias while the illustrations and the photos were provided by Rommel E. Joson and Renato S. Rastrollo respectively. It’s a non-fiction children’s picture book that was recently nominated at the 2013 Filipino Reader’s Choice Awards. What sets this book apart from the rest is that it features the Philippines’ National Living Treasures, their dedication to their crafts, and the tradition of their ancestors – our ancestors.

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Enclosed also was a CD recording of the music of Manlilikha ng Bayan Samaon Sulaiman which, according to Maricris, was courtesy of National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA).

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The front cover of the CD: Mamayog by Samaon Sulaiman

It was a very pleasant surprise for me as I was only expecting the book! Thank you so much, Maricris, book junkie, and NCCA. I hope that you will all visit my blog on October 14 and 18, 2013 as I will be featuring both the book and the music. There are also nice surprises for lucky readers so you better  watch out for it!

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Back cover of the accompanying CD.